CES Highlight: Projected Interfaces

One of the more interesting things to emerge from CES this year was a new generation of projected interface devices.  In the past, we’ve seen small contraptions that project a keyboard onto any flat surface, but now a company called evoMouse has taken the technology several steps ahead.  The new evoMouse Pet projects a virtual multi-touch touchpad onto any surface, allowing you to move the cursor, pinch to zoom, scroll, and more.  The evoMouse Cube adds on a projected keyboard as well.  Both devices are quite compact, connect via Bluetooth, and should work with Windows XP/Vista/7 PCs and Windows Mobile, BlackBerry, or Symbian-powered smartphones.  More pictures at Pocket-lint.  No word on pricing yet.

A UK firm, Light Blue Optics, took the concept even further with its Light Touch, demoing a larger device that projects a 10″ WVGA resolution touchscreen onto any surface.  The screen, which connects by Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, uses infrared touch sensing and and will support multi-touch with a software update.  It comes with 2GB of on-board storage, a microSD slot for expansion, and a battery lasting 2 hours.

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6 Responses

  1. March 4, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on the market. However, GestureTek’s gesture recognition technology, futuristic though it seems, is already on its way into consumer products. […]

  2. March 5, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on the market. However, GestureTek’s gesture recognition technology, futuristic though it seems, is already on its way into consumer products. […]

  3. March 5, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on … Continue reading this entry Related Youtube Videos Loading… @import url("http://www.google.com/uds/css/gsearch.css"); window._uds_vbw_donotrepair = true; @import url("http://www.marthees.com/videobarcss.css"); .playerInnerBox_gsvb .player_gsvb { width : 320px; height : 260px; } function LoadVideoBar() { var videoBar; var options = { largeResultSet : !true, horizontal : true, autoExecuteList : { cycleTime : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_TIME_MEDIUM, cycleMode : GSvideoBar.CYCLE_MODE_LINEAR, executeList : ["ytchannel:gsmarena07","ytchannel:pocketnowvideo","ytchannel:mobileburn"] } } videoBar = new GSvideoBar(document.getElementById("videoBar-bar"), GSvideoBar.PLAYER_ROOT_FLOATING, options); } // arrange for this function to be called during body.onload // event processing GSearch.setOnLoadCallback(LoadVideoBar); Related Technology Tweets […]

  4. March 5, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on the market. However, GestureTek’s gesture recognition technology, futuristic though it seems, is already on its way into consumer products. […]

  5. March 5, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on the market. However, GestureTek’s gesture recognition technology, futuristic though it seems, is already on its way into consumer products. […]

  6. March 22, 2010

    […] Projected keyboard interfaces have been around for a while and have had limited success, so it will be interesting to see how consumers react to this kind of projected interface. GestureTek doesn’t produce consumer products itself, but licenses the technology to OEMs, so it’s hard to say when we will see any commercial products using this technology on the market. However, GestureTek’s gesture recognition technology, futuristic though it seems, is already on its way into consumer products. […]

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